Imperial Metric Unit Conversions

By samm81
Tags: units, imperial, metric, day to day, useful

Conversions from common imperial units (foot, acre, cup, pound, etc) to their metric counterparts and vice versa.

All conversion factors are taken from Google and truncated to 4 digits after the decimal point. You probably don’t want to actually memorize to that precision (unless you’re crazy or your mental arithmetic is really good) so I would manually truncate the cards further after you download them.

The “Definitions” field is from Wikipedia’s conversion of units page.

I selected what I felt to be the most useful conversion factor, e.g. inches ⇔ centimeters rather than having all length units in terms of meters.

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Integrated Chinese Level 1 Part 1

By samm81
Tags: chinese, textbook

Flaschards for Cheng & Tsui’s Integrated Chinese Level 1 Part 1.

Contents:

  • All vocabulary from Lesson 1 through Lesson 10, including the “How About You?” boxes and the “Culture Highlights”. All vocab is tagged with which part of the book it came from, making it easy to suspend anything you’re not interested in reviewing (like the Culture Highlights vocab).
  • Both simplified and traditional characters.
  • Both pinyin and zhuying (bopomofo) pronunciation systems.
  • Extra definitions that are not in the textbook, sourced from yellowbridge.com.

Usage:

  • Cards are imported in the order they appear in the book, with one exception: if a card appears in both supplementary material (“How About You?” or “Culture Highlights”) and a dialogue vocab, it will be scheduled such that it shows up with the dialogue vocabulary, even if it appears in an earlier “How About You?” or “Culture Highlights”. This is so that if you suspend the supplementary material cards (except ones that also appear in dialogues) the dialogue vocab will appear in order.
  • By default there are six cards per vocab item: definition -> spoken, spoken -> definition, simplified -> definition/spoken, traditon -> definition/spoken (does not appear if traditional is same as simplified), definition -> simplified, spoken -> simplified. This set up assumes that you are learning to recognize both simplified and traditional, but only write traditional. You may need to adjust the cards as needed.
  • By default, pinyin is used for pronunciation. You can edit the note type to use zhuyin instead.
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Visual Studio Code Shortcuts

By pyXelr
Tags: visual studio code, software

Visual Studio Code shortcuts for Windows gathered from the official cheat sheet and categorised into subdecks.

The deck consists of all 120 keyboard shortcuts (240 cards due to the use of reverse guessing). Additionally, each Anki card displays a the category of the shortcut using the {{Tags}} field.

Other operating systems’ keyboard shortcuts and additional unassigned shortcuts are available at aka.ms/vscodekeybindings.

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Integrated Chinese Level 1 Part 2

By samm81
Tags: chinese, textbook

Flaschards for Cheng & Tsui’s Integrated Chinese Level 1 Part 2.

Contents:

  • All vocabulary from Lesson 11 through Lesson 20, including the “How About You?” boxes and the “Culture Highlights”. All vocab is tagged with which part of the book it came from, making it easy to suspend anything you’re not interested in reviewing (like the Culture Highlights vocab).
  • Both simplified and traditional characters.
  • Both pinyin and zhuying (bopomofo) pronunciation systems.
  • Extra definitions that are not in the textbook, sourced from yellowbridge.com.

Usage:

  • Cards are imported in the order they appear in the book, with one exception: if a card appears in both supplementary material (“How About You?” or “Culture Highlights”) and a dialogue vocab, it will be scheduled such that it shows up with the dialogue vocabulary, even if it appears in an earlier “How About You?” or “Culture Highlights”. This is so that if you suspend the supplementary material cards (except ones that also appear in dialogues) the dialogue vocab will appear in order.
  • By default there are six cards per vocab item: definition -> spoken, spoken -> definition, simplified -> definition/spoken, traditon -> definition/spoken (does not appear if traditional is same as simplified), definition -> simplified, spoken -> simplified. This set up assumes that you are learning to recognize both simplified and traditional, but only write traditional. You may need to adjust the cards as needed.
  • By default, pinyin is used for pronunciation. You can edit the note type to use zhuyin instead.

Additional notes:

  • If you already have the Integrated Chinese Level 1 Part 1 deck, this deck will try to import some cards that already exist. I suggest you select the “Ignore lines where first field matches existing note” field, so as to not lose your scheduling information.
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CSS One Line Layouts

By css_writer
Tags: computer science, programming, css, html, web

The 10 one line CSS layouts from https://1linelayouts.glitch.me/ . Deck is just the name and the layout, it assumes you’ve already watched the video / understand the layouts. Useful if you don’t want to stop to look these up while coding!

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Vim Single Keybindings

By cs_student
Tags: vim, programming

All the single key bindings in vim. Compiled from here.

Excludes unbound keys because why would you want to memorize those.

Definitions (from the website):

  • word - a lower-case word (“w”, “b”, “e” commands) is defined by a consecutive string of letters, numbers, or underscore, or a consecutive string of characters that is not any of {letters, numbers, underscore, whitespace}
  • Word - an upper-case word (“W”, “B”, “E” commands) is a consecutive sequence of non-whitespace.
  • sentence
  • paragraph
  • cursor motion command - any command which positions the cursor is ok here, including the use of numeric prefixes. In addition, a repeat of the edit command usually means to apply to the entire current line. For example, “<<” means shift current line left; “cc” means replace entire current line; and “dd” means delete entire current line. >>
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Standard ASCII Symbols

By cs_student
Tags: ascii, computer science, html

A deck for all the non-typable symbols (non-accented alpha characters) in standard 8-bit ASCII. This works out to be ASCII characters 161-191 which are:

¡ ¢ £ ¤ ¥ ¦ § ¨ © ª « ¬ (soft-hyphen, not visible) ­ ® ¯ ° ± ² ³ ´ µ ¶ · ¸ ¹ º » ¼ ½ ¾ ¿

This deck includes the symbol, english description, ASCII decimal code, hex code, and HTML name. You might want to disable some of the cards depnding on your use case.

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Mnemonic Major System

By memory_champ
Tags: mnemonic major, memory

I assembled this deck from wikipedia’s mnemonic major system page:

The major system … is a mnemonic technique used to aid in memorizing numbers.

The system works by converting numbers into consonant sounds, then into words by adding vowels. The system works on the principle that images can be remembered more easily than numbers.

An example, from wikipeida:

Each numeral maps to a set of similar sounds with similar mouth and tongue positions. For most people it would be easier to remember 3.1415927 (an approximation of the mathematical constant pi) as:

meteor (314, /m/-/t/-/r/)

tail (15, /t/-/l/)

pink (927, /p/-/N/-/k/, and taking /N/ to be 2)

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