A-Level OCR A Chemistry Flashcards

By Theorizing
Tags: chemistry, ocr, ocr a

These are flashcards based on A-Level Chemistry Textbook for OCR A. The deck contains roughly 1000 flashcards, with definitions, diagrams, equations and descriptions almost exclusively from the textbook. I hope you find it useful as an effective way to learn all the theory for your A-Level exams.

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Chm 111 (Tro - Chemistry A Molecular Approach)

By kahn.yiin
Tags: chemisty, tro

Flashcards made from the textbook “Chemistry: A Molecular Approach (Fourth Edition)” by Nivaldo J. Tro covering chapters 1-10 and would likely be very helpful for any college-level General Chemistry I course

Contents

  • Exhaustive and thorough card set for learning and memorizing almost all concepts, facts, figures, and more from the textbook and supplemental materials
  • The deck is divided into subdecks that correspond to the chapters in the book
  • Each subdeck starts with cards that cover the material presented in each chapter (created in the same order) and concludes with cards that cover the review questions in the Self-Assessment Quiz
  • Supplemental materials, if available, are presented amongst the cards that cover the material presented in each chapter
  • To the best of my ability, I have verified that all of the cards are clear, concise, and accurate - however, if you find any errata, please notify me via the Anki Decks website (https://ankidecks.com) so that I may make corrections ASAP

How To Use This Deck

  • By creating and sharing this deck, I hope to make learning General Chemistry I easier even if by just a little bit
  • I created this deck while taking General Chemistry I, and I was able to earn an A in the course with no additional notes of any kind
  • I hope that I have done the hard part in creating all or nearly all of the flashcards you will need to earn an A in your course

Here is how I would approach studying for General Chemistry I with this Anki deck and any college-level chemistry textbook:

  1. Back up this Anki deck to a safe location immediately after downloading
  2. Open the original copy of this Anki deck in Anki on your PC
  3. Look at the material your class will be covering for Test 1
    1. For me, Test 1 covered Chapters 1, 2, and 7
  4. Create a new Anki deck called something similar to “General Chemistry I - Test 1”
  5. Move the Cards in the corresponding subdecks to your new deck
    1. Note that moving the cards back from your new deck to the corresponding subdecks will be significantly more difficult
    2. If you need to move the cards back in their original subdecks, I would recommend making and opening another copy of the backup
    3. To move the Cards, click the subdeck on the main Anki screen, click Browse just above the deck title, highlight all of the cards you want to move, alternate-click one of the highlighted cards, click Cards on the pop-up menu, click Change Deck on the submenu, and click to highlight your new deck on the dialog that appears and then click Move Cards
  6. Find the total number of cards in your new deck
    1. To find this number, click to highlight your new deck in the left pane of the Browse window and look at the top left of the window: the total number of cards in your new deck should appear to the right of the word “Browse”
  7. Calculate the number of working days you have until Test 1
    1. This may or may not include Fridays, Saturdays, Sundays, and holidays
    2. Note that you will have to study more each day for every resting day And that you will have more cards to review the day after your resting days
  8. Divide the total number of cards in your new deck by the number of working days to find the minimum number of new cards you will have to learn each day
    1. For example, if you have 18 working days and 1,800 cards, you will have to learn a minimum of 100 cards each day
    2. Note that this may seem like a lot - and many days I felt it was - but I am sure you will find quite often that it is less that it appears
    3. Create a new preset for this number
      1. Make sure your new deck is open on the main Anki screen, click Options, click the down-arrow to the right of the Save button, click Add Preset, type a name for the new preset e.g. Focus, and click OK on the Add Preset dialog, type this number in the text box to the right of “New cards/day”, change the number in the text box to the right of “Maximum reviews/day” according to the warning message that appears, and click Save
  9. Note for this deck only, there is a section of chapter 1 that is extremely memorization-intensive
    1. For this section, I was able to limit my daily memorization to 20-40 new cards a day without much detrimental effect
  10. Regardless of how much actual time you will need for any particular day, from my experience, I would budget at least one hour for every 50 cards so 4 hours for 200 cards
  11. This is very important: on the first day (meaning not just the first day of class but the first day after each test), read the assigned chapters without taking any notes Before using Anki
    1. Then start learning the cards either on your PC or a mobile device (I mostly used my smartphone to learn new cards and my PC to review old cards)
  12. When learning the cards, I would recommend keeping a pen-and-paper handy to write down any questions you may have
  13. After learning the cards, I would recommend first searching the Internet for answers to your questions and then asking your professor about any questions you were unable to find satisfactory answers for online
  14. A week or so before test day, find the topics to be covered on the exam and go over each in as much detail as possible in your textbook and cards

Tips

  • I would recommend learning new cards before reviewing old cards, as I tried reviewing old cards first for a couple of days initially but found I was exhausted by the time the new cards appeared
    • On the other hand, I often found reviewing old cards to be easy after learning new cards
    • To learn new cards first, click Tools on the toolbar of the main Anki screen, click Preferences, click Scheduling, and select “Show new cards before reviews” from the drop-down menu
  • Sometimes the Anki scheduling algorithm does not schedule new cards in the correct order
    • For instance, you may suddenly be presented with new cards that you know to be from a different chapter
    • To be safe, before starting any new Anki deck, I recommend making sure that Anki presents new cards in the order added
    • (I always do this in Anki for my smartphone, so this is my guess for how to perform the corresponding procedure in Anki for my PC)
    • To make sure Anki presents new cards in the order added on PC, make sure your new deck is open on the main Anki screen, click Options at the bottom, click “Random” in the drop-down menu under Insertion order, click Save, close the Options dialog, click Options at the bottom again, click “Sequential (oldest cards first)” in the drop-down menu under Insertion order, click Save, and close the Options dialog
    • To make sure Anki presents new cards in the order added on a smartphone, make sure you are looking at a card from your deck on Anki mobile, tap the three dots in the upper right, tap “Deck options” on the pop-up menu, tap “New cards”, tap “New cards in order added” under Order, tap “New cards in random order”, tap the back arrow or swipe right to return to your card, tap the three dots in the upper right again, tap “Deck options” on the pop-up menu, tap “New cards”, tap “New cards in random order” under Order, tap “New cards in order added”, and tap the back arrow or swipe right to return to your card

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